The World of Supermarionation

Supermarionation?

What is Supermarionation?

Supermarionation is a puppetry technique first devised in the 1960’s by Gerry Anderson of AP Films; Gerry first coined the Term on his series “Supercar” and followed up to his last Supermarionation Series in 1969. The term is a portmanteau of “super”, “marionette” and “animation”. For the first portion of Gerry & Sylvia Anderson’s productions this technique has been used extensively and still has a lasting impression on people to this day.

Supermarionation technically is only used for Gerry Anderson's productions, however his works have inspired series by others. I am one of those people who will cover the other series or movies, not simply just Gerry Anderson's series themselves. All the series deserve a good recognition for the efforts, whether I think highly of them or not. These other series are "Space Patrol" , a series from Anderson from 1961, the Japanese "X-Bomber" which is more well known by its English entity, "Star Fleet", the South African Apartheid-era series "Interster" from 1983 and last but not least the more widely known comedy big action movie parody "Team America: World Police" in 2004, which was created by "South Park" creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone who chose the style as an affectionate tribute to the work of "Thunderbirds".

Origins
Gerry Anderson (pictured above with Lady Penelope and Parker of "Thunderbirds") commenced a long career in the television and motion picture industry when he went to work as a projectionist for the English Ministry of Information at the age of 17. This job eventually led to a position as an assistant editor with Gainsborough Studios. After a brief period as a radio operator in the Royal Air Force, Gerry took a job with Pinewood Studios as a dubbing editor. Television had become very popular during mid 1950s and was offering serious competition with the motion picture industry for the very first time. As television seemed to be the thing to get into, Gerry Anderson left Pinewood Studios to go to work for a small company called Polytechnic Studios which had been established to produce television programs. Unfortunately, Polytechnic Studios proved to be a failure and soon went out of business. In the aftermath of this event, Gerry Anderson decided that it was time to strike out in business on his own.

During late 1956 or early 1957, Gerry Anderson and a friend from Polytechnic Studios by the name of Arthur Provis pooled their meagre financial resources to form a film production company which they named Anderson Provis Productions or AP Productions for short. AP Productions started on a shoestring. The company set up operations in cheap quarters located in a flood prone converted mansion on the banks of the Thames River in Maidenhead.

The original staff of AP Productions included business manager Gerry Anderson, cameraman Arthur Provis, designer Reg Hill, technician John Read, and secretary Sylvia Thamm. With the exception of Sylvia Thamm, everyone at the company had come from Polytechnic Studios. Arthur Provis, Reg Hill, and John Read had all worked together after the second world war making military training films. As a result, each man possessed considerable experience with miniatures, animation and trick photography. Although none of them realized it at the time, these special skills would prove to be most valuable to AP Productions as time went on.

Gerry Anderson, Arthur Provis, Reg Hill, John Read, and Sylvia Thamm sat in their offices at Maidenhead and waited for business to come to them. Naturally, nothing happened. After nearly six months of nothing the money began to run out and AP Productions seemed likely to follow Polytechnic Studios into oblivion. Then, just as the end seemed imminent, a children's book author by the name of Roberta Leigh approached the company with a job. Gerry Anderson and Arthur Provis's great relief turned into equally great disappointment after they discovered that Roberta Leigh did not want them to produce a live action television series or film but instead wanted a series of 15 minute puppet shows based upon her popular 'Twizzle' book character. Desperate for income and hoping that Roberta Leigh's "The Adventures of Twizzle" television series would keep the company solvent until something better came along, AP Productions took on the job.

This fateful decision put the Andersons on the path that would lead to Supermarionation. Indeed, the entire Anderson marionette empire of the 1960s grew out of this one 'temporary' measure that was only intended to keep AP Productions in business until something better came around. Nobody associated with the company ever thought that "The Adventures of Twizzle" would ever lead to anything other than a short-term paycheck.

Puppet makers and puppeteers were now required by AP Productions so feelers went out to the British model theater community. The company hired Joy Laurie, who was experienced with children's television puppet programs, to supervise all aspects of puppetry for "The Adventures of Twizzle". Joy in turn brought on her good friend Christine Glanville, who was a talented artist, sculptor, and puppeteer.

"The Adventures of Twizzle" also required miniature sets and props. Designer Reg Hill felt he needed some help so AP Productions approached Les Bowie with an offer. Les Bowie was an established miniature effects technician who had developed a favorable reputation at Anglo-Scottish Pictures for his work on various fantasy pictures. Les Bowie had no interest in doing the unsophisticated class of work presented to him by AP Productions. However, he had a young assistant working for him who had a growing family and a need for a little additional income. This man was Derek Meddings. Derek agreed to work for AP Productions on a part time basis around his normal schedule at Anglo-Scottish Pictures. Also, the puppet production required a musical score of course, so a man named Barry Gray was brought on for this purpose. Barry Gray composed the music for "The Adventures of Twizzle" by listening to tunes that had been hummed into a portable tape recorder by Roberta Leigh.

The budget of "The Adventures of Twizzle" was so low (about $800 per episode) and the production schedule so tight that the scenery and props often had to be built in the same converted ballroom where the filming took place. As this was only a part time job for Derek Meddings, he usually performed his work at night or on weekends. However, filming often dragged on through the night so Derek frequently had to work on building scenery and props while filming was going on all around him.

Although everyone at AP Productions was concerned that "The Adventures of Twizzle" would prove to be an embarrassing flop, it actually did pretty well when introduced to British television during November 1957. In large part, this was because AP Productions had elected to use the more realistic marionette puppets instead of the simple glove puppets typically used in competing children's television programs.

The success of "The Adventures of Twizzle" led to another commission by Roberta Leigh in late 1958. Unfortunately, this commission was for a similar puppet television series called "Torchy the Battery Boy". By this time, AP Productions had become resigned to the fact that they were stuck doing puppet work, at least for the near term. However, AP Productions resolved to produce the best children's puppet program possible in the hope that their high quality workmanship would attract 'better' classes of work.

The marionettes built for "Torchy the Battery Boy" were more sophisticated and more finely modeled than those used in "The Adventures of Twizzle". Although they were still made from the same basic materials, the eyes and mouths were now made movable by means of strings attached to a thumb control on the puppeteer's cross bar. Unfortunately, these puppets were still strung with highly visible carpet thread.

It was during the filming of "Torchy the Battery Boy" that AP Productions' John Read and Reg Hill developed a truly revolutionary process which automated the motion of the puppet's mouth. This development was called 'lip sync' (for lip synchronization). The lip sync apparatus moved the puppet's hinged lower lip in synchronization with a pre-recorded vocal track. It was actually a fairly simple apparatus. Basically, electrical signals from the vocal track were conveyed through steel control wires to a solenoid located in the puppet head which opened and closed the puppet's lower lip as the amplitude of the electrical signal varied through the course of normal speech.

This apparatus was not unfortunately used during the series, other than on two single secondary characters. However whilst working on Roberta Leigh's series, Gerry and Arthur wanted to branch out and work on their own puppet based series using this technique. With £6,000 in the bank and an idea given to them by their music composer, Barry Gray, they set about making a pilot episode for a western series - this series which would become "Four Feather Falls". However, fearing that Leigh would find out and cancel their contract for ‘Torchy’ and withhold payment, they began creating the puppets and sets for their new series under the utmost secrecy.

"Four Feather Falls" proved to at that point become the most ambitious series to date that AP Studios had worked on. Much more detailed sets and sophisticated solenoid puppets proved to bring in a whole new style of puppetry - one canned as "Supermarionation" by Gerry Anderson only one series later.

The Puppets themselves
The heads of the puppets contained solenoid motors that created a synchronized movement of the mouth for dialogue. The synchronization was achieved using a specially designed audio filter which was actuated by pre-recorded tapes of the puppet’s voice actor. By 1967, the solenoid motors were able to be moved down to the puppet’s chest area, meaning the puppets could have a less “caricatured” appearance. The lip and the solenoid are connected with a thin nylon wire, running through the neck. This causes head turns to be slightly difficult and sometimes the floor puppeteer has to hold the strings somewhat lower down as well to guarantee the right head movement. According to Gerry this was a bad idea in itself since the more realistic they looked, the more difficult they were to operate.

The puppets are assembled by the puppeteers from prefabricated parts supplied by an outside company. The masters are designed and modelled beforehand and the final result is a large and medium male and female puppet. The puppets have plastic arms and legs, mostly joined together with threaded rods. Hands are screwed on to the end stubs of the arms, and are made of a type of rubber with a wire embedded in each finger, so a puppet can grip or point.

The main weight of the puppet (ca. 7lb) is supported by three tungsten steel head strings, specially drawn by the Ormiston company, with a thickness of about 0.0005" each whereas the strings on the arms are just 0.0025" thick. Two of the head strings are attached at the back of the head, below the ears and slightly towards the back of the head, while the third runs through a hole in the forehead, just above the hairline. The three strings form a triangle and are connected to a control frame with a part facing forward to support the string which goes to the forehead. Contrary to traditional marionettes, the puppets have no shoulder wires but thanks to the three head wires subtler head movements can be effected. Also, each string is adjustable for height at the control to get the head exactly level. For scenes that are situated under water or in space, the strings are attached in a different way: two at both shoulders, two at the hips, one in the back and two at both knees and ankles. Usually, such a scene is shot in slow motion with a fan blowing air along the costume to simulate swimming under water.

A puppet is strung by taking the string through the hole in the head and then knotting it to a washer. Great care must be taken when knotting the strings as, if it kinks over itself and the puppet's weight is put on it, it will break. The current for the lip-sync mechanism runs through the two back head strings, the washers of which are soldered to the solenoid controlling the mechanism. The head strings carrying the current cannot be allowed to touch the metal hand rail of the bridge since this causes them to short out and disintegrate. This problem was solved by covering all exposed metal parts of the bridge with camera tape. Between takes, the puppeteer can hang the puppet on a 'gallows', affixed to the bridge.

The strings are blended out by spraying them with Anti-Flare to make them dull and, if that is not sufficient, black, grey or white powder paint is puffed on them from a hand-held sprayer. If the background causes difficulties the puppet is moved slightly or the camera angle or the background is changed. Getting rid of the strings is especially difficult when the puppet moves out of shot from a light to a dark background. Sometimes this problem is solved through tight editing.

The strings that move the eyes have a thickness of 0.0036". They are connected to a wire rocker mechanism inside the puppet head which in turn moves the eyes and emerge from the sides of the head. On the other end they are connected to a see-saw mechanism on the control frame — if you look closely, you can see a puppeteer holding it in the top left of the picture below; the puppeteer uses his thumb to manipulate the see-saw and thus has the puppet look left or right.

The puppets can be fitted with different heads to make them frown, smile or blink their eyes, a process which was not used in any series up until "Stingray" in 1964, before that the puppets had one fixed smiling expression. This last category, the so-called 'blinkers', can no longer move their eyes, however. The puppet's eyes were painted wood at first but for "Stingray" plastic is used, the "Thunderbirds" characters have glass eyes and for those in "Captain Scarlet" the plastic eyeball has a photograph of a human iris and pupil glued into it by hand.

Responsibilities are shared between floor puppeteers and bridge puppeteers. Those on the movable bridge manipulate the puppets during shooting, the other category, necessitated by the fact that the bridge is about 10 feet in the air, positions the puppet for the camera, ensures that the strings cannot be seen on the Add-A-Vision monitor and keeps the puppet clean and tidy.

The floor of the bridge has an elevation of nine feet above the studio floor, the hand rail is about a foot higher. In some cases the puppeteers climb onto the hand rail to gain height, or a plank is laid across the hand rail so the puppeteer can reach over the set.

While they mastered these techniques, the puppeteers could never make the puppets walk convincingly. The puppets are hardly able to walk; they are about two feet tall, are too heavy and are not properly balanced. It is almost impossible to have a string puppet walk convincingly anyway, unless it concerns a heavily caricatured puppet. Most series depicted the characters either standing or sitting or they were placed in settings which allowed the use of a motorized vehicle or other sort of mechanical transport systems. By 1967 on, the Puppets were controlled via a rod below the set when the scene called for them to walk. The scene would be cropped to edit out the puppeteer and thus we would only see the characters in a head-and-shoulder shot.

On occasion, close-ups of a live actor’s hand would be used in each series to show actions such as turning a key or pressing buttons. For "The Secret Service" (1969) however, shots of live actors would be used more often to reflect more realism into the series. These shots would be used for distant shots of the characters, which was done by Gerry's decision to make up for the inadequacies of Supermarionation.

In September 1995, Sylvia Anderson sold several of the orginal puppet heads mainly from "Captain Scarlet"-"The Secret Service" along with the heads of Tin-Tin from "Thunderbirds" along with Mike Mercury, Jimmy Gibson (with a white painted face), Zarin and Masterspy (who had been revamped heavily for his role as El-Hudat in episodes of "Stingray") from "Supercar". However, full models of Lady Penelope, Marina, Captain Scarlet, Joe McClaine and Stanley Unwin were sold off at auction as well. This decision was much to the anger of Gerry. Many of the models sold were for the most part purchased by collectors who had restored them to their former glory.

Revamp puppets

Revamp puppets are puppets made especially for supporting characters in the series, to save money and the hassle of making more puppets. Revamped puppets can appear numerous times during a series run

"Space Patrol"

 

General Smith

The Robot Revolution

General Smith

Dick Vosburgh

The Rings of Saturn

General Smith

Dick Vosburgh

Mystery on the Moon

Sam Marsden

Murray Kash

The Forgers

General Smith

Dick Vosburgh

Time Stands Still

General Smith

Dick Vosburgh

The Invisible Invasion

General Smith

Dick Vosburgh

The Human Fish

General Smith

Dick Vosburgh

Explosion on the Sun

General Smith

Dick Vosburgh

The Unknown Asteroid

General Smith

Dick Vosburgh

The Evil Eye of Venus

General Smith

Dick Vosburgh

Secret Formula

General Smith

Dick Vosburgh

Sands of Death

General Smith

Dick Vosburgh

The Grass of Saturn

General Smith

Dick Vosburgh

Forcefield X

The Curator

Murray Kash

 

 

Professor Zeffer

The Swamps of Jupiter

Doctor Mall

Murray Kash

The Wandering Asteroid

Professor Zeffer

Dick Vosburgh

The Fires of Mercury

Commander Brog

Dick Vosburgh

The Shrinking Spaceman

Martian Crewmember

Dick Vosburgh

The Forgers

Martian Artist

Dick Vosburgh

Husky Becomes Invisible

Professor Zeffer

Dick Vosburgh

The New Planet

Professor Zeffer

Dick Vosburgh

The Buried Spaceship

Commander Brog

Dick Vosburgh

Message from a Star

Professor Zeffer

Dick Vosburgh

The Telepathic Robot

Professor Zeffer

Dick Vosburgh

Sands of Death

Professor Zeffer

Dick Vosburgh

The Hairy Men of Mars

Professor Zeffer

Dick Vosburgh

Destruction by Sound

Professor Zeffer

Dick Vosburgh

 

 

Martian President

The Swamps of Jupiter

Mall’s Assistant

Dick Vosburgh

The Wandering Asteroid

Martian President

Ronnie Stevens

The Slaves of Neptune

Martian Colonist

Murray Kash

The Fires of Mercury

Martian Miner

Libby Morris

The Glowing Eggs of Titan

Martian President

Dick Vosburgh

Husky Becomes Invisible

Martian President

Dick Vosburgh

The Buried Spaceship

Martian President

Dick Vosburgh

The Buried Spaceship

Martian Miner

Murray Kash

Secret Formula

2nd Martian President

Dick Vosburgh

Deadly Whirlwind

2nd Martian President

Dick Vosburgh

Sands of Death

2nd Martian President

Dick Vosburgh

The Water Bomb

2nd Martian President

Dick Vosburgh

 

 

Roberts

The Wandering Asteroid

Zeffer’s Assistant

Ronnie Stevens

The Robot Revolution

Coastguard Station 3

Ronnie Stevens

The Robot Revolution

Radio Operator

The Cloud of Death

Cloud Dispersal Officer

Ronnie Stevens

The Rings of Saturn

Radio Operator

Ronnie Stevens

Mystery on the Moon

Duty Officer Roberts

Ronnie Stevens

The Miracle Tree of Saturn

Radio Operator

Ronnie Stevens

The Forgers

Travel Agent

Ronnie Stevens

The Planet of Thought

Duty Officer Roberts

Ronnie Stevens

The Planet of Thought

Radio Operator

Ronnie Stevens

The Planet of Thought

Replacement Secretary

Ronnie Stevens

Husky Becomes Invisible

Zeffer’s Assistant

Ronnie Stevens

The New Planet

Zeffer’s Assistant

Ronnie Stevens

Message from a Star

Zeffer’s Assistant

Ronnie Stevens

The Human Fish

Doctor Roberts

Dick Vosburgh

Explosion on the Sun

Duty Officer Roberts

Dick Vosburgh

The Telepathic Robot

Zeffer’s Assistant

Sands of Death

Zeffer’s Assistant

Ronnie Stevens

Sands of Death

UGF Operator

Ronnie Stevens

The Hairy Men of Mars

Zeffer’s Assistant

Destruction by Sound

Zeffer’s Assistant

Ronnie Stevens

 

 

Doctor Brown

The Shrinking Spaceman

Doctor Brown

Ronnie Stevens

The Walking Lake of Jupiter

Doctor Brown

Dick Vosburgh

The Human Fish

Fisherman

Libby Morris

The Talking Bell

Doctor Brown

Dick Vosburgh

Explosion on the Sun

Doctor Marshall

Ronnie Stevens

Deadly Whirlwind

Doctor Marshall

Ronnie Stevens

The Shrinking Gas of Jupiter

Doctor Brown

Ronnie Stevens

This puppet originally appeared as Ms. Julie, the kindly old lady from “Sara & Hoppity”

 

 

Jim Barratt

The Shrinking Spaceman

Doctor Smith

Dick Vosburgh

The Robot Revolution

Jim Barratt

Ronnie Stevens

The Cloud of Death

Moon Observatory Scientist

Ronnie Stevens

The Miracle Tree of Saturn

Jim Barratt

Ronnie Stevens

The Walking Lake of Jupiter

Doctor Smith

Ronnie Stevens

The Talking Bell

Doctor Smith

Ronnie Stevens

The Telepathic Robot

Doctor

Dick Vosburgh

Sands of Death

UGF Major

Ronnie Stevens

The Jitter Waves

Jim Barratt

Ronnie Stevens

Destruction by Sound

Doctor

Ronnie Stevens

 

 

Gamewarden

The Slaves of Neptune

Martian Colonist

Dick Vosburgh

Mystery on the Moon

Berridge’s Aide

Libby Morris

The Forgers

Lead Forger

Dick Vosburgh

Husky Becomes Invisible

Gamewarden

Murray Kash

Explosion on the Sun

Jackson

Dick Vosburgh

Secret Formula

Kolig

Dick Vosburgh

Sands of Death

Tirig

Dick Vosburgh

 

 

Venusian President

Volcanoes of Venus

Venusian President

Dick Vosburgh

Volcanoes of Venus

Replacement Venusian

Dick Vosburgh

Mystery on the Moon

Major Valla

Dick Vosburgh

The Human Fish

Venusian President

Dick Vosburgh

Explosion on the Sun

Venusian President

Dick Vosburgh

The Unknown Asteroid

Venusian President

Dick Vosburgh

The Evil Eye of Venus

Venusian President

Dick Vosburgh

Secret Formula

Venusian President

Dick Vosburgh

This puppet appears to be the original puppet used for Slim in the earlier episodes of Season 1, this however is unclear.

 

 

Berridge

Mystery on the Moon

Berridge

Dick Vosburgh

The Miracle Tree of Saturn

Jones

Ronnie Stevens

The Forgers

Forger

Ronnie Stevens

Explosion on the Sun

Duncan’s Assistant

Dick Vosburgh

Secret Formula

Kolig’s Aide

Dick Vosburgh

The Water Bomb

Brig

Ronnie Stevens

This puppet originally appeared as the old man who sold Hoppity to Sara in “Sara & Hoppity”

 

 

Gallia

Volcanoes of Venus

Gallia

Dick Vosburgh

Time Stands Still

Tara

Dick Vosburgh

The Human Fish

Patra

Libby Morris

The Unknown Asteroid

Miga

Ysanne Churchman

The Evil Eye of Venus

Professor Borra

Ysanne Churchman

Sands of Death

Borse

Ysanne Churchman

This puppet would go on to be revamped for the role of Doctor Fang in “Wonder Boy & Tiger” and as a street sweep in the first episode of “Send for Dithers”.

 

 

Giant

The New Planet

Giant

Murray Kash

The Hairy Men of Mars

Martian Primitive

Dick Vosburgh

Destruction by Sound

Prospector

Murray Kash

 

 

Aszom

Volcanoes of Venus

Gallia’s Aide

Murray Kash

Time Stands Still

Aszom

Ronnie Stevens

Explosion on the Sun

Dara

Ronnie Stevens

The Unknown Asteroid

Miga’s Aide

Ronnie Stevens

The Evil Eye of Venus

Presidential Aide

Ronnie Stevens

Sands of Death

Venusian

The Water Bomb

Venusian

Ysanne Churchman

 

 

Doctor Duncan

Explosion on the Sun

Doctor Duncan

Ronnie Stevens

The Evil Eye of Venus

Williams

Ronnie Stevens

Secret Formula

Doctor Mason

Ronnie Stevens

Deadly Whirlwind

Scientist

Dick Vosburgh

The Water Bomb

Marog

Dick Vosburgh

 

 

Mac

Mystery on the Moon

Mac

Murray Kash

Mystery on the Moon

Man in Japan

Ronnie Stevens

The Miracle Tree of Saturn

Japanese Representative

Ronnie Stevens

Sands of Death

Tyrig’s Accomplice

Ronnie Stevens

The Shrinking Gas of Jupiter

Scientist

Dick Vosburgh

 

"Star Fleet"
The Series, like "Space Patrol" used limited puppet with several puppets using the same puppets for multiple roles in episodes. Considering the majority of the series takes place in Deep Space, we don't see many of these puppets. Voice actors are mainly assumed, based on similarities to the main cast.

 

Cruiser 1 Captain

Scramble X-Bomber

Cruiser 1 Captain – Pluto Base

Jay Benedict

 

 

Communications Officer

Scramble X-Bomber

Communications Officer

Jay Benedict

Super Powerful Imperial Alliance Fleet

Communications Officer

Jay Benedict

Find F-01

Communications Officer

Jay Benedict

Wipe Out the Transport Fleet

Communications Officer

Jay Benedict

X-Bomber Goes Forth

Communications Officer

Jay Benedict

Battle to the Death: X-Bomber v. the Imperial Alliance

Communications Officer (flashback)

Jay Benedict

The End of the Earth

Communications Officer

Garrick Hagon

A New Beginning for the Galaxy

Communications Officer

Garrick Hagon

 

 

Situations Officer

Scramble X-Bomber

Situations Officer

 

Scramble X-Bomber

Pluto Astro Fighter Pilot #2

Jay Benedict

Scramble X-Bomber

Pluto Missile Base

Jay Benedict

Super Powerful Imperial Alliance Fleet

Situations Officer

Jay Benedict

Super Powerful Imperial Alliance Fleet

Ocean Patrol Pilot #2

Jay Benedict

Find F-01

Situations Officer

 

Wipe Out the Transport Fleet

Situations Officer

Jay Benedict

X-Bomber Goes Forth

Situations Officer

Jay Benedict

Battle to the Death: X-Bomber v. the Imperial Alliance

Situations Officer (flashback)

 

The End of the Earth

Situations Officer

Jay Benedict

A New Beginning for the Galaxy

Situations Officer

 

 

 

Astro Fighter Pilot #3

Scramble X-Bomber

Pluto Astro Fighter Pilot #3

Garrick Hagon

M13: Full Frontal Attack Begins

Callinean Advisor #3

 

 

 

EDF Officer

Scramble X-Bomber

EDF Officer

The End of the Earth

EDF Officer

NOTE: We never get a real good look at this large puppet, as it is merely a background puppet seemingly. Behind the scenes photos do show this puppet

 

  

 

EDF Officer #2

Super Powerful Imperial Alliance Fleet

EDF Officer #2

Constantine Gregory

Wipe Out the Transport Fleet

EDF Officer #2

 

The End of the Earth

EDF Officer #2

Garrick Hagon

 

 

EDF Officer #3

Scramble X-Bomber

Pluto Base Officer

 

Super Powerful Imperial Alliance Fleet

EDF Officer #3

John Baddeley

The Mysterious Ship “Skull”

Pluto Base Officer

 

X-Bomber Goes Forth

EDF Officer #3

 

M13: Full Frontal Attack Begins

Callinean Advisor

Garrick Hagon

M13: A Battle With no Tomorrow

Callinean Advisor

 

 

 

EDF Officer #4

Super Powerful Imperial Alliance Fleet

EDF Officer #4

Denise Bryer

The End of the Earth

EDF Officer #4

 

 

EDF Officer #5

Scramble X-Bomber

EDF Officer #5

 

Super Powerful Imperial Alliance Fleet

EDF Officer #5

 

Wipe Out the Transport Fleet

EDF Officer #5

 

X-Bomber Goes Forth

EDF Officer #5

 

Note: Like the first one, we get no real good look of this puppet supposedly (unless this one is one of the others) and again is seen in publicity photos of the puppet stocks.

 

 

Commander Vargas

Find F-01

Commander Vargas

Peter Marinker

X-Bomber Goes Forth

Mars Ocean Patrol Pilot

Jay Benedict

Note: I’m unsure of whether or not the puppet was reused, the Mars Pilot had a helmet covering his head and no mustache, but his chin is the closest thing resembling Vargas’

 

Princess Keeli

Farewell the Eternal Battlefield

Princess Keeli

Liza Ross

 

 

The Seer

Lamia Kidnapped

The Seer

 

M13: Full Frontal Attack Begins

Callinean Advisor #2

 

 

 

Skull Crew Member

Scramble X-Bomber

Pluto Base Officer

 

Lamia Kidnapped

Skull Crew Member

 

M13: Full Frontal Attack Begins

Skull Crew Member

 

M13: A Battle with No Tomorrow

Skull Crew Member

 

A New Beginning for the Galaxy

Skull Crew Member

Garrick Hagon

 

 

Skull Crew Member #2

Scramble X-Bomber

Pluto Base Communications Officer

 

Super Powerful Imperial Alliance Fleet

Ocean Patrol Pilot #1

Garrick Hagon

The Mysterious Ship “Skull”

Pluto Base Communications Officer

 

Lamia Kidnapped

Skull Crew Member

 

M13: Full Frontal Attack Begins

Skull Crew Member

 

M13: A Battle with No Tomorrow

Skull Crew Member

Garrick Hagon

The End of the Earth

Skull Crew Member

Garrick Hagon

A New Beginning for the Galaxy

Skull Crew Member

 

 

 

Callinean Aide

Scramble X-Bomber

Moonbase Staff

 

M13: Full Frontal Attack Begins

Callinean Aide

Garrick Hagon

M13: A Battle with No Tomorrow

Callinean Aide

Garrick Hagon

 

 

Callinean King

Scramble X-Bomber

Pluto Astro Fighter Pilot #2

 

M13: Full Frontal Attack Begins

Callinean King

Garrick Hagon

M13: A Battle with No Tomorrow

Callinean King

Garrick Hagon

 

Callinean Queen

Scramble X-Bomber

Moonbase Secretary

Denise Bryer

Farewell the Eternal Battlefield

Keeli’s Mother

 

M13: Full Frontal Attack Begins

Callinean Queen

 

M13: A Battle with No Tomorrow

Callinean Queen

Denise Bryer